29 Stunningly Beautiful Imperial Faberg Eggs ...

By Neecey

29 Stunningly Beautiful Imperial Faberg Eggs ...

The Imperial Fabergé eggs are among the most glorious works of art ever created. The work of Carl Fabergé, the eggs were made between 1885 and 1917 for the Imperial Russian family for whom he was the appointed jeweler. The House of Fabergé made many stunning pieces of jewelry but it is the Imperial Easter Eggs, significant for their exquisite materials and perfectly executed tooling that has the collecting world lusting after them. And lust they must, because there were only 52 made, of which 43 have survived. There are thousands of facsimiles but nothing will ever live up to the original Fabergé Eggs - the highest price paid to date for a genuine, original is $18.5million!

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1

The Winter Egg

Crystal, Centrepiece, Glass, Plant, Still life photography, Considered the most beautiful of the Fabergé Eggs. The egg is made from rock crystal, platinum, diamonds and moonstone. Every Fabergé Egg contains a "surprise" sometimes visible, sometimes hidden until the egg is opened. In this case, the surprise is a miniature basket of flowers made from platinum, gold, white quartz, jade and green garnets. The Winter Egg was made in 1913 and is currently owned by the State of Qatar.

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The Winter Egg is one of the most stunning of the Imperial Fabergé Eggs. It was crafted from rock crystal, platinum, diamonds, and moonstone and features a surprise inside. The surprise is a miniature basket of flowers made from platinum, gold, white quartz, jade, and green garnets.

The Winter Egg was made in 1913 and is currently owned by the State of Qatar. It is a part of the collection of the famous jeweler, Peter Carl Fabergé, who was commissioned by Tsar Alexander III of Russia to create the Imperial Fabergé Eggs.

The Imperial Fabergé Eggs are considered some of the most exquisite and beautiful works of art in the world. Each egg is intricately crafted and unique, with its own surprise inside. Some of the surprises are visible and some are hidden until the egg is opened. The Winter Egg is one of the most popular of the Imperial Fabergé Eggs and is highly sought after by collectors.

2

The Moscow Kremlin Egg

Landmark, Dome, Architecture, Building, This is the largest of the Fabergé Imperial Eggs and was presented by Tsar Nicholas to Tsarina Alexandra as his Easter gift in 1906. Made of gold, silver, onyx, and enamel and representing the Uspensky Cathedral, where the tsars of Russia were crowned, it features tiny working clocks (12mm) and plays two of the tsar’s favorite Easter hymns.

3

The Alexander III Portraits Egg

The Alexander III Portraits Egg Made from stunning dark blue translucent enamel and set with rose cut diamonds, the egg features the monograms of MF (Maria Feodorovna) and AIII (Alexander III) and was presented in 1895 to Maria in commemoration of Alexander's death. Now owned by the Hillwood Museum in Washington.

4

The Tzarevich Egg

The Tzarevich Egg Made in 1912 from lapis lazuli, gold, and diamonds, the egg denotes the Louis XV style. The surprise is a platinum framed watercolor miniature. It is now on display in the Museum of Fine Arts, Richmond, USA.

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The Tzarevich Egg was created by the renowned jeweller Peter Carl Fabergé for Tsar Nicholas II of Russia in 1912. It is decorated with lapis lazuli, gold, and diamonds in the style of the French Louis XV period. The egg contains a surprise inside - a platinum framed watercolor miniature. This beautiful piece of jewelry is now on display in the Museum of Fine Arts in Richmond, USA. It is one of the most stunning examples of the Imperial Fabergé Eggs, a series of jeweled eggs created by Fabergé for the Russian Imperial family between 1885 and 1916.

5

The Revolving Miniatures Egg

The Revolving Miniatures Egg Made from rock crystal, gold, Siberian emeralds, and rose-cut diamonds, the egg was gifted by Tsar Nicholas to Alexandra Feodorovna in 1896. The miniatures are exquisite paintings of places significant to the Imperial Family. It is now owned by the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts in Richmond.

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Crafted with meticulous care, the Revolving Miniatures Egg is a marvel of artisan mastery, blending elegance with personal history. When opened, it reveals a series of portraits that rotate to reveal each meaningful location. These tiny yet intricate hand-painted images hark back to joyous moments shared by the royal couple, resonating with their love story. The use of precious materials emphasizes not just the opulence, but also the sentimental value bestowed upon this cherished gift. The Imperial egg encapsulates a blend of lavishness and intimacy, making it a standout piece among the Fabergé collection.

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6

The Lilies-of-the-Valley Egg,

The Lilies-of-the-Valley Egg, Another gift from the Tsar to his wife (in 1898) this egg is rose pink and green enamel, gold and pearls. The miniatures of the Tsar and two of his children are painted on ivory. The egg is currently the property of the Link of the Times Foundation in Russia.

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Impeccably crafted by the famed jeweler Peter Carl Fabergé, this egg is synonymous with opulence and regal splendor. It bears exquisite pearl-encrusted details, enhancing its delicate beauty. The choice of lilies-of-the-valley, often associated with humility and happiness, suggests a tender message from the Tsar to his Empress. Nestled within the egg's intricate design, the hidden surprise—an enchanting portrait miniature—adds an intimate touch, reflecting the royal family's personal life with adoration and subtlety. Unquestionably a masterpiece, it encapsulates the grandeur of a bygone era.

7

The Cockerel Egg

The Cockerel Egg The 1900 egg is made from varicolored gold, enamels, diamond, rubies, and pearls. A crowing cockerel made from gold and feathers rises out of the egg. It is now the property of the Link of the Times Foundation in Russia.

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This exquisite creation, hatched by the legendary Peter Carl Fabergé's workshop, isn't merely a stunning objet d'art—it breathes historical significance with every shimmering detail. Imagine the surprise and delight as the mechanical rooster pops up to announce the morning with its miniature splendor, a hallmark of Fabergé's mastery in integrating movement and beauty. Gifted to Empress Alexandra by Tsar Nicholas II, it epitomizes royal affection and the opulence of an era that reveled in grandeur. Emblematic of both time and tradition, this egg stands as a testament to unparalleled craftsmanship and the extravagances of Imperial Russia.

8

The Pansy Egg

Fashion accessory, Jewellery, Gemstone, Jade, Turquoise, Also known as the Spinach Jade Egg, this was the Tsar’s gift in 1899. It is made from nephrite (a form of jade), silver gilt, diamonds, and enamel. The heart “surprise” is made from exquisitely colored enamels rose-cut diamonds, pearls and mother of pearl. The Pansy Egg is currently the property of a private collector.

9

The Madonna Lily Egg

The Madonna Lily Egg Also known as the Bouquet of Lillies Clock, the Tsarina received this as a gift in 1899. Made from varicolored gold, platinum, onyx, rose-cut diamonds and enamel, it is now owned by the Kremlin Armory Museum, Moscow.

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The Madonna Lily Egg is a stunningly beautiful imperial Fabergé egg made from varicolored gold, platinum, onyx, rose-cut diamonds and enamel. It was gifted to the Tsarina in 1899 and is now owned by the Kremlin Armory Museum, Moscow. The egg is an exquisite work of art, intricately crafted with a bouquet of lilies encircling the egg. It is a beautiful example of the craftsmanship of the Fabergé artisans and a reminder of the opulence of the Russian Imperial court. It is a symbol of grandeur and elegance that continues to fascinate and captivate viewers to this day.

10

The Gatchina Palace Egg

The Gatchina Palace Egg Presented by Nicholas II to Dowager Empress Maria Feodorovna in 1901. It's made from quatre-couleur, translucent enamels, diamonds and seed pearls. It opens to reveal a quatre-couleur gold miniature of the Gatchina Palace in a velvet lining. Now owned by the Walters Art Gallery, Baltimore, USA.

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This exquisite piece showcases the extraordinary craftsmanship of the House of Fabergé. With intricate details mimicking the majestic Gatchina Palace, once the Empress's favorite residence, the egg is a token of familial affection and imperial opulence. It captures the essence of royal life through its delicate use of materials that only a tsarina would possess. The rich hues and the sparkling embellishments reflect the grandeur that surrounded the last of the Romanovs. Today, this beguiling treasure allows a glimpse into a bygone era, nestled within the esteemed collection at the Walters Art Gallery for all to admire.

11

The Swan Egg

The Swan Egg One of the Imperial Fabergé Eggs given by Tsar Nicholas II to his mother, Dowager Empress Maria Feodorovna. Just 10 cms high, it is made from gold, enamel, and diamonds. The surprise is a silver-plated gold swan sitting on a miniature lake made from an aquamarine. When wound up the swan’s wings spread. Owned by the Fondation Edoaurd et Maurice Sandoz, Lausanne, Switzerland.

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The Swan Egg is one of the Imperial Fabergé Eggs given by Tsar Nicholas II to his mother, Dowager Empress Maria Feodorovna. It is made of gold, enamel, and diamonds, and is only 10 cm high. Inside the egg is a silver-plated gold swan sitting on a miniature lake made from an aquamarine. When wound up, the swan’s wings spread. The egg is currently owned by the Fondation Edoaurd et Maurice Sandoz in Lausanne, Switzerland. The Imperial Fabergé Eggs are a collection of 50 exquisitely crafted jeweled eggs created by the House of Fabergé for the Russian Tsars from 1885 to 1916. Each egg was designed to be a unique surprise gift for the Tsar's mother, wife, or other important members of the Imperial family. The Swan Egg is a stunning example of the craftsmanship and artistry of the House of Fabergé.

12

The Pelican Egg

The Pelican Egg This was the Tsar's present to his Tsarina in 1898. It is crafted from red gold, diamonds, pearls, and enamel with eight painted miniatures on ivory. The current owner is the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, Richmond, USA.

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The Pelican Egg is an epitome of regal opulence and Peter Carl Fabergé's exquisite craftsmanship, reflecting the pinnacle of Russian Imperial artistry. A symbol of love and continuity, the egg hides a surprise - a miniature pelican feeding her young, mirroring the maternal care of the Empress. Its intricate design and emotional depth make it a treasured masterpiece, resonating with the grandeur and poignancy of the bygone Romanov dynasty. Visitors to the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts are often captivated by its detailed beauty, where it continues to enchant and educate art aficionados and historians alike.

13

The Clover Leaf Eg

The Clover Leaf Eg Made from green gold, platinum, diamonds, and rubies, this egg was made in 1902 and was another of the Tsar’s gifts to his wife. The surprise has been lost but it is known to have been a 4-leafed clover set with diamonds and miniature portraits of the Tsar’s four daughters. The egg is owned by the Kremlin Armory Museum in Moscow, Russia.

14

The 15th Anniversary Egg

The 15th Anniversary Egg Like a number of the Fabergé Eggs, it is set with paintings of the Imperial Family. The 1911 egg is made from gold, enamel, diamonds, and rock crystal with the 16 portraits being on ivory panels. It is owned by the Link of the Times Foundation in Russia.

15

The Alexander III Equestrian Monument Egg

The Alexander III Equestrian Monument Egg Presented by Nicholas II to Dowager Empress Maria Feodorovna in 1910. It is made from rock crystal, gold, and diamonds. The statue is fashioned from green gold, lapis lazuli and rose-cut diamonds. It is the property of the Kremlin Armory Museum in Moscow, Russia.

16

The Love Trophies Egg

The Love Trophies Egg V

The 1907 egg is also known as the Cradle of Garlands Egg and was presented by the Tsar to his mother. It is made from gold, enamel, diamond, rubies, and pearls and has a velvet lining. The now missing surprise was made of white enamel, ruby, pearls, and rose-cut diamonds, with watercolors of the Imperial children. Mr. Robert M. Lee of the USA is the current owner.

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This opulent piece was a gift of deep affection, embodying the familial bond between the Empress Maria Fedorovna and her son. Crafted with meticulous care, the gold foundation serves as a canvas for the intricate enamel work—a testament to the exceptional skills of the Fabergé artisans. The Love Trophies Egg’s luxurious materials and the lost surprise highlighting tender portraits symbolize a personal narrative, one interwoven with the threads of royal life and motherly love. Its current keeper, having acquired it for a private collection, ensures this treasure continues to be cherished and its history preserved.

17

The Catherine the Great Egg

The Catherine the Great Egg The 1914 egg is also known as the Grisaille Egg or the Pink Cameo Egg. It is made from quatre-couleur gold, pink grisaille, enamel, diamonds, and seed pearls. Before being lost, a mechanical sedan chair made from gold, enamel, and diamonds sat on a velvet lining. It is part of the Marjorie Meriwether Post Collection on display in the Hillwood Museum, Washington DC, USA.

18

The Red Cross Easter Egg

The Red Cross Easter Egg Presented to Empress Alexandra by Tsar Nicholas II in 1915, it’s made from silver, gold, and enamel. The surprise is made from mother of pearl with watercolors on ivory. The portraits are the Tsarina, the Tsar’s sister, two daughters, and a cousin. It was made in 1915 and commemorates the service of Maria Feodorovna to the Russian Red Cross. It is in the Lillian Pratt Collection at the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, Richmond, USA.

19

The Rose Trellis Egg

The Rose Trellis Egg Presented by Nicholas II to Tsarina Alexandra Feodorovna. The 1907 egg is made from gold, enamel, and diamonds. It has a silk lining which used to hold an oval diamond chain and locket set with watercolors. The egg is the property of the Walters Art Gallery, Baltimore, USA.

20

The Alexander Palace Egg

The Alexander Palace Egg Hand-painted with portraits of the five royal children of Tsar Nicholas II of Russia and Tsarina Alexandra, the 1908 egg is made from nephrite, gold, diamonds, and rubies. The portraits are on ivory. The surprise is a gold miniature of the Alexander Palace. It is owned by and on display in the Kremlin Armory Museum in Moscow, Russia.

21

The Bay Tree Egg

The Bay Tree Egg The Bay Tree Egg from 1911 is made of gold, green & white enamel, nephrite, diamonds, rubies, amethysts, citrines, pearls, and white onyx. The surprise is a tiny feathered songbird which rises out of the top of the tree when a hidden lever is depressed. The bird sings, flaps its wings and sings. It is now the property of the Link of the Times Foundation in Russia.

22

The Romanov Tercentenary EgG

The Romanov Tercentenary EgG Made in 1913 for Tsar Nicholas II as a present to his wife, the egg celebrates the three hundred years of rule of Russia by the Romanov Dynasty. It is made from gold, silver, diamonds, turquoise, rock crystal, purpurine, enamels and watercolors on ivory. The surprise is a miniature globe made from steel, varicolored gold and enamel. It currently stands in the Kremlin Armory Museum in Moscow, Russia.

23

The Mosaic Egg

The Mosaic Egg This stunner is one of four Fabergé Eggs in the royal collection of Queen Elizabeth II (Prince Philip is a direct descendant of the Romanovs and there are family connections on the Queen’s side too). It is one where the surprise (7.9cm) is only just a bit smaller than the egg (9cm) itself. The shell is made from yellow gold, platinum, enamel and mosaic tiles of diamond, emerald, topaz, sapphire, garnet, pearl, and moonstone. The surprise is a miniature of the five Romanov children set on a pedestal made from gold, enamel, pearls, garnets, and diamonds

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The Mosaic Egg is one of the most exquisite and valuable Fabergé Eggs in the world. It is part of the royal collection of Queen Elizabeth II, who has a direct connection to the Romanov family through her husband Prince Philip. The egg itself is made from yellow gold, platinum, and a variety of precious gemstones, including diamonds, emeralds, topaz, sapphires, garnets, pearls, and moonstones. The surprise inside is a miniature of the five Romanov children, intricately crafted from gold, enamel, pearls, garnets, and diamonds. This egg holds not only immense historical significance, but also showcases the incredible craftsmanship and attention to detail that was typical of Fabergé pieces.

24

The Cross of St. George Egg

The Cross of St. George Egg Gifted by the Tsar to the Dowager Empress (his Mom), the 1916 egg is made from silver, gold, enamel and watercolor portraits on ivory The surprise is a hidden portrait of Tsarevich Alexai Nikolaievich, the heir who never made it to the throne because of the Russian Revolution. This is the last egg the Dowager received and is the only one of the Fabergé Eggs to have left Russia with its original owner. It is now owned by the Link of the Times Foundation in Russia.

25

The Caucasus Egg

The Caucasus Egg Made in 1893 from yellow and varicolored gold, silver, platinum, enamel, diamonds, pearl, ivory, and rock crystal. It commemorates the imperial hunting lodge in Abastumani. Four pearled doors open to reveal watercolor miniatures on ivory. The surprise is lost and it is one of only two Fabergé Eggs to use red because the family associated the color with the Tsarevich’s hemophilia. It is currently in the collection of the Matilda Geddings Grey Foundation.

26

The Diamond Trellis Egg

The Diamond Trellis Egg One of the early and simplest eggs by Fabergé, it is made from gold, jadeite, diamonds, and silver. The satin lining originally held a since lost miniature elephant crafted from ivory, gold, enamel, and diamonds. The elephant was the first automaton produced in the Fabergé workshops. The egg originally sat on a base supported by three cherubs which has also been lost. The Diamond Trellis Egg is now in the McFerrin Collection, Houston, USA.

27

The Coronation Egg

The Coronation Egg Made in 1897, the egg is fashioned from gold, enamel, and diamonds lined with white velvet. The accompanying miniature coach is made from gold, platinum, enamel, diamond, rubies and rock crystal. Other surprises that are now missing were a pendant, display case and stand. The owner of the egg today is the Link of the Times Foundation, Russia.

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The Coronation Egg stands as a magnificent testament to the opulence of the Russian Imperial family. Commissioned by Tsar Nicholas II as a gift for his wife, Empress Alexandra Fyodorovna, it commemorates their 1896 enthronement. Peter Carl Fabergé, the renowned jeweler, ensured that this egg captured the grandeur of the event, with the exquisite coach modeled after the imperial carriage. Despite the loss of several original components, the intricate craftsmanship continues to dazzle, echoing the bygone splendors of a fallen empire and remaining a treasured piece of art and history in the hands of its current custodians.

28

The Basket of Wild Flowers Egg

The Basket of Wild Flowers Egg The 1907 Flower Basket Egg is made from silver, parcel gilt, enamel, and diamonds. Little is known about the surprise but the original paperwork describes pearls among the materials used and there are no pearls on the egg itself. This is another in the ownership of Queen Elizabeth II.

29

The Rosebud Egg

The Rosebud Egg Source: mieks.com

This was the first egg presented by Nicholas II to his wife, Alexandra Feodorovna, in 1895. It is made from varicolored gold, enamel, and diamonds. The cream velvet lining holds a yellow enamel rosebud. The bud originally contained two surprises: a miniature crown made from gold, diamonds and rubies and a pendant containing a cabochon ruby. The egg is another in the ownership of the Link of the Times Foundation in Russia.

Stunning aren’t they? Which one do you like most?

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Beautiful!

Lovely article

I've seen the exhibit in Richmond...they are absolutely beautiful and quite fascinating!

I saw a few in a Faberge exhibition a couple of years ago at Buckingham Palace. Simply breath taking!

These are amazing!!!!! Great post!

I love this.

#16 is kinda flat wouldn´t want to do my project on that. Add more details too, I can barely get any information out of this paragraph

i got one, my greatgrandma gave it to my grandma and she gave it to my mom and know i own it, it is a very special one and im sooo in love with it

Is there any of theese item we could buy .if there is then Where

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